Buying Athletic Shoes for Your Foot Type

Buying athletic shoes can be a very daunting task, especially with the never-ending options of shoes found at stores. However, there is a science to athletic shoes, so you can find a pair that are best for you and decrease the chances of injury to your feet with some fundamental knowledge.

Before buying an athletic shoe, you must know what type of foot you have. Of course, there are subtle differences in everyone’s feet, but in general, there are three main foot types and athletic shoes, subsequently, are made for each of these foot types.

Foot Types:

1. Neutral foot: A neutral foot has a medium arch, which allows the pressure and force of running to be evenly distributed throughout the foot. Additionally a neutral foot has an adequate amount of pronation, a movement that occurs during weight bearing where the bottom aspect of the arch moves toward the floor. Therefore the arch gets lower and the foot is more flexible in a pronated state. Since a neutral foot has the necessary amount of pronation, this foot is flexible enough to absorb the pressure of running and walking and adjust to changing terrain. Also, a neutral foot has an adequate amount of supination. Supination is a movement of the foot where the arch of the foot rotates off of the floor creating a higher arch and a more rigid foot. With an adequate amount of supination, a neutral foot is rigid enough to push off the ground without causing injury. Recommended shoes for a neutral foot type are stability shoes.

2. Over Pronated/Flexible foot: This foot type has a very low or flat arch, which increases pressure on the inside of the foot and big toe during walking or running. This usually results in an increase of skin thickness on the inside of the big toe and ball of the foot. Also, this type of foot is more flexible than a neutral foot. In the pronated position the foot is not rigid enough to push off the ground. Since an over pronated is a more flexible foot, motion-control running shoes are recommended for this foot type.

3. Over Supinated/Rigid foot: An over supinated foot has a very high arch, which increases pressure throughout the heel, the outside of the foot and ball of the foot. Compared to an over pronated foot, an over supinated foot is rigid and is not able to absorb the forces applied to the foot than the other foot types. An over supinated foot/rigid foot type benefits more from a cushion running shoe.

Shoe Types:

1. Motion control shoes: This type of shoe is best for patients with excessive pronation or a flat arch. The back of the shoe that cups the heel is known as a heel counter. The heel counter in a motion control shoe is rigid to prevent excessive pronation that occurs in a flexible foot. Additionally, the outline and shape on the bottom of motion control shoe is straight and broad at the front of the foot. This shape is also designed to improve stability like have a wide wheelbase on a car.

To test a motion control shoe, grasp the heel counter with your hand and squeeze the heel counter. The heel counter should not deform with compression of your hand.

Another way to test for motion control is to grab the front of the shoe with one hand and the back of the shoe with the second hand and twist the shoe. The shoe should not deform with the twisting motion. The final test to determine the amount of motion in the shoe is to bend the front and back of the shoe together like a book. The bend of the shoe should be at the ball of the foot where the foot pushes off the ground during activity and should not bend in the middle of the shoe.

2. Cushion shoes: This type of shoe is best for patients with excessive supination or a high arched rigid foot. Cushioned shoes decrease pressure on the feet by absorbing forces transmitted from the ground while running. The outline and shape on the bottom of cushion shoes tend to curve at the front of the foot with extra padding at the front and middle of the shoe. Additionally, cushion shoes tend to have an hourglass shape when looking at the sole where the middle part of the sole is narrower than the front or back. Compared to motion control shoes, it is easier to twist a cushion shoe. Additionally, when bending the front and back of a cushion shoe together like a book, the bend is also at the ball of the foot, but the amount bend is greater and easier to perform than a motion control shoe.

3. Stability shoes: This type of shoe is recommended for a neutral foot type. This shoe has components of both a motion control shoe and a cushion shoe. The outline and shape on the bottom of stability shoe is semi-curved at the front of the foot. This type of shoe has cushion for absorbing forces from activity, but also like motion control shoes, has a firm heel counter, but is not as rigid as a motion control shoe.

General Shoe Fitting Rules:

1. Measure both feet standing

2. Try on shoes later in the day when feet are more swollen

3. Try on shoes half a size larger to compare fit

4. Leave one finger width from the end of the longest toe to the end of the shoe

5. Wear the shoe indoors first for 10 minutes or more to make sure it is comfortable

6. Shoes should not need a break-in period they should be comfortable when you try them on.

7. Make sure nothing pinches you inside the shoe

8. Do not wear a shoe for the first time in a race.

Replacing Shoes:

Shoes should be replaced about every 300-500 miles of running or walking or 45-60 hours of a sport activity. If there is creasing around the shoe lining, new athletic shoes must be considered. Another test to determine when to replace shoes is by seeing whether or not the shoe is uneven when it is placed on a flat surface.

Why Running Shoes Don’t Work

The running shoe model needs to be fixed. Pronation, motion control, cushioning, and stability shoes? Get rid of them all.

It’s not just barefoot running and minimalism versus running shoes, the either/or situation many portray it to be. It’s much deeper than that. It’s not even that running shoe companies are evil and out to make a profit. Shoe companies may be accomplishing the goals they set out for, but maybe the goals their aiming for are not what need to be done. The paradigm that running shoes are built upon is the problem.

Running shoes are built upon two central premises, impact forces and pronation. Their goals are simple, limit impact forces and prevent overprontation. This has led to a classification system based on cushioning, stability, and motion control. The problem is that this system may not have any ground to stand on. Have we been focused on the wrong things for 40+years?

I’ll start with the customary statistic of 33-56% of runners get injured every year (Bruggerman, 2007). That is kind of mind blowing when you think about it. Since there are a ton of injuries going on, let’s look at what shoes are supposed to do.

Pronation:

As said earlier, shoes are built upon the premise that impact forces and pronation are what cause injuries. Pronation, in particular has been constructed as the bane of all runners. We have become inundated with limiting pronation via motion control shoes. The central idea behind pronation is that overpronating causes rotation of the lower leg(i.e. ankle,tibia, knee) putting stress on the joints and therefore leading to injuries. Running shoes are therefore designed to limit this pronation. Essentially, running shoes are developed and designed to put the body in “proper” alignment. But do we really need proper alignment?

This paradigm on pronation relies on two main things: (1)over pronation causes injuries and (2) running shoes can alter pronation.

Looking at the first premise, we can see several studies that do not show a link between pronation and injuries. In an epidemiological study by Wen et al. (1997), he found that lower extremitly alignment was not a major risk factor for marathon runners. In another study by Wen et al. (1998), this time a prospective study, he concluded that ” Minor variations in lower extremity alignment do not appear conclusively to be major risk factors for overuse injuries in runners.” Other studies have reached similar conclusions. One by Nigg et al. (2000) showed that foot and ankle movement did not predict injuries in a large group of runners.

If foot movement/pronation does not predict injuries or is not a risk factor for injuries, then one has to question whether the concept is sound or working…

Looking at the second premise, do shoes even modify pronation? Motion control shoes are designed to decrease pronation through a variety of mechanisms. Most choose to insert a medial post or a similar device. In a study by Stacoff (2001), they tested several motion control shoe devices and found that they did not alter pronation and did not change the kinematics of the tibia or calcaneus bones either. Similarly, another study by Butler (2007) found that motion control shoes showed no difference in peak pronation when compared to cushioning shoes. Lastly, Dixon (2007) found similar results showing that motion control shoes did not reduce peak eversion (pronation) and didn’t change the concentration of pressure.

This is sort of a double whammy on motion control shoes. If excessive pronation does not cause injuries to the degree that everyone thinks, and if motion control shoes don’t even alter pronation, what’s the point of a motion control shoe?

Cushioning:

Impact forces are the other major scoundrel of running injuries. The thinking goes like this, the greater the impact force on the lower the leg, the greater stress the foot/leg takes, which could potentially lead to injuries. To combat this fear, running shoes, particular cushioning ones, are to the rescue. Let’s take a look.

The first question is, do cushioning shoes do their job?

Wegener(2008) tested out the Asics Gel-Nimbus and the Brooks Glycerin to see if they reduced plantar pressure. They found that the shoes did their job!….But where it reduced pressure varied highly. Meaning that pressure reduction varied between forefoot/rearfoot/etc. This led to the interesting conclusion that their should be a shift in prescribing shoes to one based on where plantar pressure is highest for that individual person. It should be noted that this reduction in pressure was based on a comparison to another shoe, a tennis shoe. I’m not sure that this is a good control. Basically, this study tells us that cushioned running shoes decrease peak pressure when compared to a Tennis shoe.

In a review on the subject, Nigg (2000) found that both external and internal impact force peaks were not or barely influenced by the running shoes midsole. This means that the cushioning type does not change impact forces much, if at all. But how can this be? I mean it’s common sense if you jumped on concrete vs. jumped on a shoe foam like surface, the shoe surface is softer right? We’ll come back to this question in a minute.

Impact Forces: The picture gets cloudier:

But it’s not as simple as described above. In an interesting study by Scott (1990) they looked at peak loads on the various sites of likely injury for runners (Achilles, knee, etc.). All peak loads occurred during mid-stance and push off. This led to an important finding that “the impact force at heel contact was estimated to have no effect on the peak force seen at the chronic injury sites,” and led to speculation that impact force did not relate injury development.

Further complicating the impact force idea is that when looking at injury rates of those running on hard surfaces or soft surfaces, there appears to be no protective benefit of running on soft surfaces. Why is this? Because of something called pre-activation and muscle tuning which will be discussed below.

Supporting this data, other studies have shown that people who have a low peak impact have the same likelihood of getting injured as those with a high peak impact force (Nigg, 1997). If you want to complicate things even further, impact seems to be the driving force between increased bone density.

As a coach or trainer this should make sense. The bone responds to the stimulus by becoming more resistant to it, IF the stimulus is not too large and there is enough recovery.

Underestimating our Body: Impact forces as feedback:

Back to the question I asked earlier: How can impact forces not change based on shoe sole softness and why isn’t running on hard surfaces lead to more injuries?

The problem is, once again, we underestimate the human body! It’s an amazing thing, and we never give it the credit it deserves. The body adapts to the surface that it’s going to strike, if you give it a chance. The body adapts to both shoe and surface adjusting impact forces via changes joint stiffness, the way the foot strikes, and a concept called muscle tuning.

An example of this can be seen with barefoot running, the diminished proprioception (sensory feedback) of wearing a shoe negates the cushioning of the shoe. Studies using minimal shoes/barefoot have shown that the body seems to adapt the impact forces/landing based on feedback and feedforward data. When running or landing from a jump, the body takes in all the sensory info, plus prior experiences, and adjusts to protect itself/land optimally As mentioned above, it does this through a variety of mechanisms. Thus, you stick some cushioned running shoe on the bottom of your foot and the body goes “Oh, we’re okay, we don’t need to worry about impact as much, we’ve got this soft piece of junk on our foot.

One concept that needs to be further discussed is muscle tuning. It’s a concept recently proposed by Nigg et al. in 2000. He sees impact force as a signal or a source of feedback, as I stated earlier. The body then uses this information and adjusts accordingly to minimize soft tissue vibration and/or bone vibration. His contention is that impact force is not the problem, but rather the signal. Muscle tuning is essentially controlling these vibrations via a variety of methods. One potential mechanism is pre-activation. Pre-activation is activation of the muscles prior to impact. In this case it serves as a way of muscle tuning to prepare for impact and in addition can alter muscle stiffness, which is another way to prepare for impact. Pre-activation has been established with multiple EMG studies.

Shoes not only impact this, but surface type does too. As mentioned previously, the change in running surface did not impact injury rates. Why? Probably because the body adapts to running surface. In an interesting study measuring muscle activity, O’Flynn(1996) found that pre-activation changed based on surface. To prepare for impact, and presumably to minimize muscle/bone vibration, when running on concrete pre-activation was very high, when running on a soft track, not so much.

What all of this means is that the body adapts via sensory input. It has several different adaptation methods. A shoe influences how it adapts. The shoe is not doing anything to alter cushioning, it is simply altering how the body responds to impact. It’s a significant mindset jump if you think about it. Here’s the summary: The type of shoe and material of the shoe changes impact NOT because of alignment of the lower leg or because of changes in cushioning. Instead it changes impact characteristics because it alters the sensory feedback.

In conclusion on the cushioning concept. Well, what are we trying to cushion? Heel impact forces have not been shown to relate to injuries, in fact in one study low impact runners had a 30% injury rate compared to a 20% injury rate in high impact runners. Shoe midsoles do not change, or marginally change impact forces anyway. So, not only may cushioning not be the answer, the shoes might not even be doing their job. But what about those shoe cushioning studies showing improved cushioning with their new midsole?! Well, the majority of that testing is done by using a machine to simulate the impact forces that you experience during running. That means, yes it may cushion an impact more, but it doesn’t take into account the role of the body adjusting impact based on feedback.

The reason cushioning doesn’t work? Because the body adapts based on feedback and feedforward information. These results prompted one notable researcher(Nigg,2000) to call for the reconsideration of the cushioning paradigm for running shoes.

Barefoot running?

Quickly, this topic could not be complete without a brief mention of barefoot running. An interesting thing to note is that the initial peak impact force is absent in barefoot running when compared to running with shoes. What this means is that, the impact forces look like (A) for shoes and (B) for barefoot. That initial little blip in A is the initial impact force. There is a hypothesis that this initial impact force is related to injuries.

A recent study by Squadrone et al.(2009) compared running shoes, barefoot running, and running in Vibram Five Fingers. They demonstrated reduced impact forces, shorter ground contact and stride length, but increased stride frequency while running barefoot (and in Vibrams) as compared to running with shoes. This is not unexpected, but shows that running shoes do in fact alter our normal strides. An interesting point is the reduction in stride length but increase in stride frequency. Shoes tend to promote this longer stride at a consequence of ground contact times and frequency. This happens because of changes in feedback signaling, increased likelihood to land on heel stretched out, increased weight, all of which lead to longer times on the ground. It’s interesting to note that elite runners all have short ground contacts and high frequencies (as demonstrated by the often quoted Daniels study of 180 strides per minute).

Tying this to the discussion above on the body controlling things based on sensory information, when running barefoot, there is a higher degree of stiffness in the lower leg. Increased stiffness can result in an increased SSC (stretch shortening cycle) response, resulting in greater force on the subsequent push off (2001). Dalleau et al. demonstrated that pre-activation causing increased stiffness improved Running Economy. In his study, the energy cost of running was related to the stiffness of the lower leg (1998)

Another recent study found that knee flexion torque, knee varus torque, and hip internal rotation torque all were significantly greater in shoes compared to barefoot. What does all of this mean? Potentially, this means more stress on the joints in this area. Jay Dicharry put it best when he said:

“The soft materials in modern running shoes allow a contact style that you would not use barefoot. The foot no longer gets the proprioceptive cues that it gets unshod. The foot naturally accommodates to surfaces rapidly, but a midsole can impair the foot’s ability to react to the ground. This can mute or alter feedback the body gets while running. These factors allow a runner to adopt a gait that causes the elevated forces observed above.”

The one thing that non-barefoot/heel strike proponents use to dismiss midfoot striking/barefoot running is the Achilles tendon. They say, correctly, that the load on the Achilles is higher in midfoot striking runners. The Achilles is meant to take a large load. The problem is we’ve weakened the Achilles through years of wearing shoes with their elevated heels. Essentially, we’ve created the Achilles problem with the shoes meant to prevent it. The Achilles is designed to operate in a rubber band like fashion.. During impact such as the braking or contact phase of running, the achilles tendon stores energy and then subsequent releases that energy via recoil during the take off phase of running. The Achilles, can store and return approximately 35% of its kinetic energy (Ker, 1987). Without this elastic storage and return, the oxygen uptake required would be 30-40% higher! So, in terms of performance why are we trying to minimize the tendonous contribution? It’s like giving away free energy.

Running shoes do not utilize the elastic storage and return as well as barefoot or minimal shoes. More energy is lost with shoes than with barefoot running (Alexander and Bennett, 1989). In addition, in some models of shoes, the arch is not allowed to function like a spring. The arch of the foot can store around 17% of kinetic energy (Ker, 1987). Given these results, its not surprising that running barefoot when compared to running with shoes is more efficient. Several studies have shown a decreased VO2 at the same pace with barefoot running, even when weight is taken into account. This should be no surprise as I mentioned above, without elastic recoil VO2 requirement would be 30-40% higher. Running in a minimal shoe allows for better utilization of this system.

So, the take away message is that shoes change natural mechanics to one that creates mechanical changes that are not optimal for running fast (decreased stride frequency, increased ground contact, decreased stiffness of the system, decreased elastic contribution, and on and on).

Tying it together with elites:

Looking at elite athletes, when racing and training, they generally have higher turnover, minimal ground contact time, and a foot strike that is under their center of gravity. Since the majority of elites exhibit these same characteristics while racing, it makes sense that this is the optimal way to run fast. So, why are we wearing footwear that is designed to increase ground contact, decrease turnover, and promote footstrike out in front of the center of gravity? I have no idea.

Conclusion:

In conclusion, I’m not some fanatic saying everyone ditch shoes now. Chances are you’ve been running in shoes for 20+ years. Your bodies done some adapting during that time. You’ve got to gradually change if you want to undue some of the changes.

The purpose of this article wasn’t to talk about the benefits of barefoot running. Instead it was to point out the problems with Running Shoe classification. It’s based on a cushioning/pronation paradigm that simply is not as true as they want us to believe. That paradigm needs to be reevaluated. It’s not founded on good science but rather initial ideas that made sense with no science behind them, but upon further review may not stand up to testing. A recent study found that using the good old shoe classification system that everyone uses, had little influence on injury prevention in a large group of Army Basic Training participants (Knapik, 2009). They concluded that selecting shoes based on arch height (like all major running magazines suggest) is not necessary if injury prevention is the goal. I guess that means the systems broken…

Where do we go and how do we fix it? I have no idea. Sorry, no genius answers here. My inclination is that we aim for letting the foot function how it is meant to function, or at least come up with some shoe that may alter foot mechanics but while still allowing feedback/functionality of the body. The first step is looking at the foundation on which running shoes are built upon, the motion control, stability, and cushioning paradigm. My take is that it needs to be reevaluated. I’m going to end with something I’ve already said, but it’s an important concept to get across:

The body is more complicated and smarter than we give it credit. The type of shoe and material of the shoe changes impact or stride characteristics NOT because of alignment of the lower leg or because of changes in cushioning. Instead it changes impact and stride characteristics because it alters the sensory feedback. The brain is a wonderful thing.’

If you found this article to be informative, I’d appreciate it If you passed it along. The goal is to get research based data out there so people can be well informed.

Things to Look for When Buying Womens Shoes

Women’s shoes come in different styles, shapes and sizes. They also come in different widths; narrow medium, and wide shoes. As a woman with large size legs I find it challenging to choose or to get a great a pair of shoes that will fits. Most of the companies do not make large sizes shoes for women. This is why when I buy a shoe, it must be worth the price, the comfort and the sweat.

Here are some pointers that I use to find shoes that I have stayed with for a long time and with no regrets attached.

Size of the shoe.

The first thing you want to look for, and it goes without saying, is the size. It is simple, but it can be complex. Shoe companies have different outcomes when it comes to sizes. Some shoes run small and some other run large for the same sizes.

It is ridiculous.

I know that for sure since Aerosoles shoes do run large for size 11 sometimes ( not all styles). Do not just pick a shoe because it is your size. Try on the shoe and see if it fits. The thing to consider nowadays is to look at your range so if you are a size 11 like me you have to consider size 10 1/2, size 11, size 11 1/2 and probably size 12 for those that run really small, if it is a great shoes that you really want.

Another thing to consider in size is the width; medium, wide and extra wide. If you have large size legs then the wide sizes are very crucial. I have slender legs, not so thin as to warrant a narrow shoe but definitely now a wide size or extra wide unless in special conditions, as you will see below. I mainly do medium size shoes.

I have found that a size 10 (wide) may fit my legs if it is an open shoe or sandals or wedges. With wedge shoes I look for size 10 wide most of the time. They fit well and leave toe room. I have to be carefully not to have my toes sticking out but it is always great getting a smaller size shoe for large size legs. It trims the size.

And for those that wear narrow try the narrow and the medium. Some medium shoes would really fit well and give you a great toe room in the shoe.

Look for comfort in a shoe.

The other thing to look for in a shoe is comfort. Having large legs I sometimes just get desperate and pick up a shoe because I am tired and I really want to have a shoe on or end my search. A big mistake.

Comfort is very crucial. I have a pair of Clarks shoes that have stayed with me for years. They were comfortable right out of the box and they have been comfortable all through.

Some shoes do require a break in. What is a break in? You wear the shoe they will hurt or pinch for a few days then fit. Such shoes sometimes end up being the best shoes because once they have expanded they will feet your leg and toes really nice and can stay that way for a long time. The only down side with this breaking in thing is that, if they are bad shoes and you walk in a long time with your toes crunched and squeezed they may leave you with a life long blister. And as a precaution, no matter what, if the shoe is pinching right out of the shelf or after a few minutes in your legs,do not squeeze in it, it you may leave you with deformities for life.

On the other side when you slip into a shoe and it fits well and leaves some great toe room, watch out, such shoes may expand and expand and after some months they will look like baskets. I have some Aerosole shoes that have done that with me and it has not been good.

Look for shoes that compliment your wardrobe.

I love black shoes since they can go with just about anything in my wardrobe. So,yes, black should be one of the colors to look for.

With the current times and trends women are adorning some striking, bold-colored shoes colors that are great. Red is great color if you can find a toned down leather in red. I have seen some green that would do well with long skirts. Some people go for white shoes, but I have never been one to consider white shoes so much.

The best thing is to look at your wardrobe and buy a shoe or sandal that will go with many of the clothes in there. Well, unless you are Gayle and you can afford 1000 pairs of shoes. 1000 pairs of shoes is not good for the environment if you think about it. Less is more. Help others if you have more to spare and spread the love.

Choose Your Heel size According to Situation.

Heel size, heel size, very crucial. Rule of thumb: If you are going for an official presentation then choose a raised dress shoe. There is no forgiving if you are putting on an official attire with flat shoes. A raised shoe gives you the edge. And of course you will not put in a raised wedge sandal for an official presentation or with a suit.

Long skirts, long summer dresses and shorts are great with raised wedge sandals and flat shoes.

The heel you prefer depends on what you are doing and how much walking you will do with the shoe and the occasion involved. Just make sure they are comfortable.

Price of the shoe.

That is left for each one of us depending on our pockets. Men have it easy ( at least my husband) they buy one expensive pair of shoes and they stay with that shoe for years, well worth for their money. With women we love having new things over and over again. Sometimes a cheap shoe goes a long way, most times cheap shoes are just that, they are cheap, they look cheap, they spoil, they look fake and they are uncomfortable.

Expensive shoes can get you in debt and still pinch your toes and bruise your ankle.

The main thing to look for is comfort and if the shoe compliments your wardrobe. Buy shoes that will go with you a long way at a price that you can afford. Simple.

The shoe brand.

Some companies make shoes for money and others makes shoes with the customer in mind. I always look for brands that tend to make shoes that stay a long time. I look for brands that make comfortable shoes in my size. I look for brands that evolve with the times. I look for brands that put quality in their equation. I look for brands that make shoes that are true to size.

I look for companies that price shoes in relation to normal people..the 99 % of they do not target the chosen few. Companies that make a shoe that we the majority can afford and feel satisfied with the purchase.

The shoe brand you choose is subjective. As for me, having large size legs I am limited to the brands that I can buy from, mainly Aerosoles and Clarks if I am hurried for time and others if I dig dipper. If I had smaller legs I would have a plethora of brands to choose from and others to snub.

I know you have your own reasons and brands for buying a particular shoe. For all women it all boils down to affordability, comfort and the purpose of the shoe as the main reasons for womens shoes. Choose wisely and tip your heel.

Otomix Wrestling MMA Combat Shoes Product Review

Most athletic shoes for sports that require any amount of running have a slightly raised heel. This pitches your weight a bit more over the ball of the foot offering a faster transition for the first step of a run and better ability to pick up or maintain speed. This style of shoe offers the best ergonomics for the most efficient way to run. However in most combat sports, athletes perform in smaller areas and do very little actual running. These activities are better performed wearing shoes with a completely flat sole. The problem is the selection of flat-soled athletic shoes pales in comparison with the millions of raised heel running footwear for sale. One of the best and most popular flat-soled athletic sneakers is made by a brand named Otomix. This company has been making original and authentic performance workout shoes since 1988. Flat soles make Otomix footwear a top choice for combat athletes such boxers, wrestlers, martial artists and mma fighters. However all the different styles are excellent for any weight lifting and of course looking great when lounging around away from the gym.

Otomix wrestling and boxing workout shoes are high top w/incredible ankle support from thickly padded sides. They also offer some of the best low top athletic shoes designed specifically for martial arts training. Otomix shoes are well known for lasting practically forever. They are not the cheapest priced athletic sneakers you will find, however the price is worth the quality you will get. All styles are made with the most premium quality materials and expert craftsmanship for incredible durability. No matter what you want them for, Otomix combat weight lifting shoes are very lightweight and excellently balanced. All styles are built for comfort, support and performance that will improves the quality of your training translating into more wins and success in your sport. Another great feature of Otomix combat shoes is their fantastic look that will add more style to your appearance and swag in your step.

While traditional martial artists train in bare feet, many are finding better performance from the added support and traction of a good karate shoe. Otomix mma and martial arts combat footwear offers additional support for the arch while they hug the mid-foot and heel for a snug but comfortable fit. Otomix martial arts shoes and boots also offer great protection for the toes when kicking an opponent or heavy bag. Besides the glove-like, comfortable feel, these extremely lightweight karate shoes have a soft sole with tread designed for best gripping traction on carpets, training mats, ring floors and even tile. The flexible sole allows the wearer to really feel the floor, enhancing balance and kicking power while also providing an effective safeguard against ankle or foot injury. The Otomix karate shoe is perfect for mixed martial arts training, Taekwondo, Karate or sports performed on mats and even Yoga.

When it comes to flat soled shoes, you will find boxing shoes to be the flattest. This is so fighters can plant their back heel for power punching and keeping balanced for fast evasive movement when backed up against the ropes. Otomix boxing shoes are amazing for all types of boxing training and competition combat in the ring. All Otomix boxing boots come high on or over the ankle to provide additional protection and support for the joint when moving laterally or an unexpected fall. Otomix MMA shoes are also excellent for boxing in for a shoe that’s not quite as high on the calf, however their mid-calf boxing boots are some of the best in the business. The soft rubber soles of this boxing footwear offer maximal grip in the ring for incredible traction. Besides sparring and competing in the ring, Otomix boxing shoes are also excellent for jumping rope, bag work, practicing combos on focus mitts, shadow boxing and footwork.

The best wrestling shoes have soft rubber flat soles, are extremely lightweight and are highly flexible for the best traction on the mat. A common complaint however is their flexibility often takes away from the amount of support they offer. This is simply not the case with Otomix wrestling shoes. Otomix makes several hybrid wrestling shoes; these are the Escape Stingray MMA boot and Ninja Warrior Combat Shoes. Comparatively, these sneakers may not be as light as some of the top brand wrestling shoes (yet they are still very lightweight) but they offer the most support around the ankle. If you’re an athlete who struggles with weak ankles or just do better with a tighter feel around this area, Otomix wrestling shoes are for you. Otomix grappling sneakers also tend to last longer than most other brand name wrestling shoes as the material used is much thicker and craftsmanship a bit more sturdy. Most wrestling shoes are lucky to last a full season, however you will easily get several from Otomix footwear.

In weight lifting, if your weight shifts forward over your toes during an exercise, it can be disastrous, particularly in the squat and deadlift. These exercises plus many others require flat soles so you can stay balanced over your heels. Besides grappling and boxing, Otomix three-quarter and high top athletic footwear is also excellent for amateur and even pro weight lifting. The Otomix Escape MMA wrestling shoe, Ninja Combat and even their boxing shoes offer great support, grip and balance for nearly all types of strength training. These flat soled shoes are fantastic for keeping you safely grounded on your heels for the best performance during all compound lifts. Besides powerlifting, Otomix wrestling shoes are also excellent for bodybuilding, strongman training and even quite a bit of cross fit. Otomix flat soled Combat shoes are not however, designed for running on surfaces much harder than a grappling mat. These shoes do not have the amount of arch support or tread that running on pavement or long distances requires. They are not good for sprinting on pavement, aerobics or long distance treadmill work. Overall, any Otomix combat shoe is a great buy for how long they last and how well they perform. If you’re into combat sports, weight lifting or just want to add more style to your look, buy a pair of Otomix shoes, you won’t be dissatisfied.